‘It’s the next step’: The latest news on the NBN rollout

News Corp’s chief executive officer Andrew Forrest has confirmed the telco is working with a number of industry groups to get its NBN rollout up and running, and has flagged that it will have a “major” NBN rollout by the end of 2020.

Forrest said the company was in “the final stages of its roll out” of the fibre-to-the-node network and was “working hard” with industry and Government to get the network up and working.

“We’re very proud of what we’ve built in Australia, we’ve got the best broadband infrastructure in the world,” Forrest said.

“And we’ve also got a very strong track record of delivering NBN in a way that we know works for consumers.”

Forrest said that the rollout would take about two years to complete and would be completed by the beginning of 2021.

“It’s not the next big thing, but it’s the biggest step we’ve ever taken,” Forrest told the ABC.

“If you look at the NBN’s been a very positive thing for the Australian economy, for the national economy, then we’re very confident that this is going to be the next huge step in our plan to deliver a much more robust, modern NBN.”

We’ve got a great team of engineers working on this, we’re working with industry to make sure it’s working, we have the best network infrastructure in Australia.

“But it’s also the next major step for us.”

Forrest also said that “we’re not looking at a blanket rollout”.

“We’ve had an extensive process of getting this going, we know what the challenge is, and we’re taking every opportunity to mitigate the risk and make sure that this works, and that we deliver a robust, reliable and scalable system.”

The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has also been asked to look at whether the rollout could pose a risk to public safety, and the Government has confirmed that the company will have to make “hard decisions” on whether or not to make changes to the network.

The NBN rollout will be rolled out by the start of 2021, but Forrest said he did not know when that would be.

“I don’t know the exact date, I don’t even know when the first rollout is,” Forrest added.

The Government has said that it wants to see more than 100,000 homes connected to the NBN by the middle of the decade, but the rollout is expected to cost about $8 billion and be finished by 2021. “

That’s one of the big questions, do we need to go further down the road, do more work with the ACMA and make changes in that process?”

The Government has said that it wants to see more than 100,000 homes connected to the NBN by the middle of the decade, but the rollout is expected to cost about $8 billion and be finished by 2021.

Forrest was speaking at the launch of the NBN project, the biggest in Australia’s history.

“At this stage we know how it will be done, we understand the challenges, we are looking to the future and the future will be much more complex than we thought,” Forrest remarked.

Forrest also revealed that NBN Co would not be buying back any of the land that the previous Labor government had bought up for the NBN in exchange for its promise to invest $1.5 billion in infrastructure.

“In many ways, it is an opportunity to buy back a bit of land,” Forrest noted.

“One of the things that was so compelling about that election campaign, and it was a key thing that Labor talked about in the campaign, was that we would have the infrastructure we need, and this is a huge infrastructure project.”

Forrest’s comments come after the ABC reported on a report from the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) that NBN’s network will have “significant and unacceptable” reliability issues and “a poor network management and performance record” that would need to be rectified.

“NBN Co has an existing record of poor network performance and poor network governance, and a poor network design,” the report stated.

“This is a matter that needs to go before the Australian Federal Police (AFP) and the ACCC, but NBN Co is not the party to investigate these matters.” “

The report said that NBN had also failed to properly test its fibre-coaxial (FCoC) and copper-copper (PCoC)-based infrastructure in areas such as the south and central West. “

This is a matter that needs to go before the Australian Federal Police (AFP) and the ACCC, but NBN Co is not the party to investigate these matters.”

The report said that NBN had also failed to properly test its fibre-coaxial (FCoC) and copper-copper (PCoC)-based infrastructure in areas such as the south and central West.

“As part of the rollout, NBN Co should ensure that it does not have access to any existing copper infrastructure,” the commission wrote.

Forrest dismissed the findings, saying that he had “no idea what the ACCC is saying”.

“The NBN Co has been through a long process of this and I don�t know what is going on,” Forrest admitted.

“What I do know is that I think